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The UK's heatwave: UPF 50+ sun protective clothing can help reduce “reliance" on sunscreen

The UK's heatwave: UPF 50+ sun protective clothing can help reduce “reliance" on sunscreen

The UK is experiencing some unusually hot weather. At the time of writing, this weekend is on track to experience a mini heatwave, with temperatures in London rising towards 30°C. A heatwave is usually declared when temperatures exceed the average maximum temperature of an area for at least 3 days in a row. According to the Met Office, the next few days will see "plenty of sunshine" and temperatures will rise further.

The Met Office also recommends using sun protective measures if you have outdoor plans, as high and very high levels of UV are forecast for the next few days. See below the Met Office's UV Forecast for the past weekend (12 & 13 June 2021) and its tweet encouraging the public to remember sun protection.

UV Forecast June 2021

As a result of the hot weather and the associated public health risks, there has been recent news commentary in the UK about the use of sun protective measures and sunscreen with a SPF of 30 or more needing to be incorporated into daily routines, especially for those that spend a lot of time outdoors, rather than only when taking a trip to the beach or going the park.

Unfortunately in the UK, the rate of skin cancers caused by UV radiation either from the sun or sun beds is not showing any signs of slowing down, which has led experts to conclude that sun safety behaviours have not improved. 
We welcome the fact that the mainstream media in the UK is spreading the message that sun safety is a daily requirement.

According to Cancer Research UK Sunsmart, skin cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in the UK, with over 15,400 cases of malignant melanoma (the most serious type of skin cancer) and over 20,000 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (the less deadly type of skin cancer) diagnosed each year. 

Over the last decade, melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have increased by 50% in the UK. Rates in males have almost increased by 64%, and rates in females have increase by 39%, according to the MetOffice.

Dermatologists and skin experts have long been of the view that the best way to protect yourself from the risk of sun burn, skin ageing, skin cancer, and melanoma is to wear UPF 50+ sun protective clothing. With Solbari's UPF 50+ broad brim sun hats and sun protective clothing, it is possible to cover up, be UV protected, and stay cool at the same time. Exposing the skin to direct sunlight not only increases the risk of sun burn and skin damage, but, contrary to popular belief, also makes it a lot harder to stay cool and reduce perspiration.

Sunscreen is a great way to protect yourself if you have no choice but to expose your skin to the direct sunlight. However, a better alternative to sunscreen is UPF 50+ sun protective clothing. Once you try it, we think you will agree.

Solbari offers a range of products which includes UPF 50+ sun protective clothing, UV 50+ arm sleeves, sun protective driving gloves, sun umbrellas and SPF 50+ sunscreen.

You can find out more about Solbari's sun protective range by clicking the blue links below:
Women UPF 50+
Men UPF 50+
Sun Hats UPF 50+
Accessories UPF 50+
SPF 50+ Sunscreen
Skin Check App

The Solbari Team      
This blog is for information purposes only, always consult your medical professional



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