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Your Story Series: Meet George

Solbari blog: Your Story Series: Meet George

What is your name?

Hi, my name is George Robinson.

Describe yourself.

Doting and proud Poppy.

What is your attitude towards sun protection today?

I am originally from UK where the sun was absolutely not a factor in my childhood years. Although I still managed the occasional bout of sunburn as I recall. Although I have never really enjoyed being at the beach. Probably a blessing now.

Having spent 38 years in Australia and I think being typical stubborn male I certainly did not wear sunscreen or cover up for many years It wasn't something I placed as important. Even my wife gave up asking me to.

As the years go by I have had a few random spots appear and fortunately they have all been benign. Even so it made me realise I am not invincible and all the years in the sun have caused damage. And as I spend more time than ever on the water I knew I had to start being sensible. Also all the knowledge we acquire regarding the sun finally sunk in.

Every time out on the water I wear my hat and long sleeved polo. The legionnaire hat covers back of my neck fantastically. This is a usually neglected area on most people. Sunscreen on the nose. I do have regular skin checks too.

I guess as you get older you realise health is everything. Nowadays when we have the precious grandchildren I am the first to put hats on them and sunscreen. When I was, younger there was no awareness of skin cancers! 

What would you tell your 16-year-old self about sun protection?

I did not arrive in Australia till I was 22 so I will go back to then. My baby son was born and I am horrified to admit I was not vigilant with protecting him from the sun. Once again not being aware and being complacent. He had his fair share of sunburn. So I would say I wish I could change that. And tell myself I am not invincible and sunburn is not cool. When I see young (and older too) lying, baking themselves on the beach or wherever I just shake my head. Tanned skin is not worth the risk.

Thank you George for helping raise awareness for skin cancer, melanoma and skin conditions, and sharing your story with us and our Solbari Community.

The Solbari Team



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