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How is skin cancer diagnosed?

Solbari Blog: How is skin cancer diagnosed?

How is skin cancer diagnosed?

The first step in diagnosing skin cancer starts with yourself. 

Medical professionals encourage people to examine themselves for skin cancer on an ongoing basis.

When undertaking a self examination it is helpful to be in a location where there is good natural light and where you can use mirrors to look at body parts which are harder for you to see yourself. The benefit of regularly checking your own skin is that you build an awareness of changes over time.

Using the ABCDE method, you should be able to identify a potential issue. ABCDE stands for Asymmetry, Border, Colour, Diameter and Evolving. If you are unfamiliar with the ABCDE method please see our blog specifically in relation to that topic here.

If you have a fair skin complexion it is important to have a skin check with a medical professional at least every 18 months. Irrespective of your skin type it is important to get your skin checked by a medical professional from time to time. If you have a specific concern you should seek medical attention as soon as you can.

During a skin cancer check the doctor will methodically examine your body. In the event that they identify a potential issue they are likely to recommend that they remove the lesion under local anaesthetic for further examination. The extracted lesion will be examined under a microscope by a pathologist.

It may take a number of days for the pathology results to be confirmed. Your doctor will be in touch with you to confirm the results. In the event that the results confirm a skin cancer, the type of skin cancer and its level of development will dictate what remedial actions if any are recommended by your medical professional.

Skin cancer is primarily caused by the cumulative exposure to the sun. Skin cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer.

Dermatologists recommend UPF 50+ sun protection clothing as the most effective means of protecting yourself from the sun.

Solbari is the leading Australian sun protective clothing brand with customers in over 60 countries. Solbari offers a range of UPF 50+ sun protective clothing, broad brim sun hats, arm sleeves, gloves and umbrellas.

You can find out more about Solbari's certified UPF50+ sun protective range by clicking the blue links below:
Women UPF50+
Men UPF50+
Sun hats UPF50+
Accessories UPF50+

The Solbari Team
This blog is for information purposes only, always consult your medical professional



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