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6 myths about skin cancer and sun protection

6 myths about skin cancer and sun protection

Myth number 1: Sunscreen is all I need
The use of sunscreen is just one of a number of skin protection measures you should use every day. According to dermatologists and medical experts, it should not be your primary form of protection and not your only one.

Below are some sun protective measures to help you protect your skin whilst enjoying the outdoors:

- Wear UPF50+ sun protective clothingthat blocks UVA and UVB rays
- Wear a broad brim sun hat with a UPF50+ rating.
- Wear sunscreen with an SPF of 50+ on areas not covered by your UPF50+ clothing. Apply it 20 minutes before going out, and reapply every 2 hours. To be the most effective, it needs to be applied generously (thickly).
- Use water resistant sunscreen and reapply after swimming and perspiring.
- Wear sunglasses which block the UV rays.

Myth number 2: I have had a skin check before, so I will be OK in the future

Your skin is your largest organ and it changes with time. If you've had a skin check recently then good on you. You've done the right thing. But this means that you are ok at that particular point in time. A skin cancer or melanoma can appear at any time. This is why frequent checks are preferable.

Myth number 3: My face needs the most sun protection

People often cover their face at the beach, but not the rest of their body. This is a big mistake as the most common site for melanomas for men occurs on their back and the legs for women. Your whole body needs protection from the sun.

Myth number 4: All melanoma skin cancer starts with a mole

Not all melanomas arise from a mole. Approximately 40% of melanomas arise out of pre-existing moles. Having a professional check your skin is essential as melanomas can also arise from unmarked skin.

Myth number 5: You can’t get skin cancer if you have dark skin

Well, that's also incorrect. Did you know that Bob Marley died from melanoma on his toe? People with fair skin usually have a higher rate of skin cancer and are more at risk, but this clearly indicates that people all skin types need to protect their skin.

Myth number 6: I'm healthier with a tan

According to medical experts, tanning is skin cells in trauma and UV damaged. Skin cells produce melanin to protect themselves. The frightening thing is that one damaged skin cell can start a deadly melanoma growing.

Tanning can also lead to structural damage to the skin and cause burning and scarring in the short term and premature skin ageing, wrinkles and loose skin.

Solbari is an Australian brand that offers a range of UPF 50+ clothing and accessories including UPF 50+ driving gloves, UV arm sleeves, sun umbrellas and broad brim sun hats. All Solbari fabrics are independently tested and rated UPF50+ by the Australian Government. Solbari has loyal customers in over 70 countries.

You can find out more about Solbari's certified UPF50+ sun protective range by clicking the blue links below:   
Women UPF50+
Men UPF50+   
Sun hats UPF50+   
Accessories UPF50+   

The Solbari Team   
This blog is for information purposes only, always consult your medical professional.



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